Sengkuang with Hoisin Sauce Snack

I’ve mentioned that my parents are visiting from Malaysia. Everytime they come to visit, they are tasked to bring my sister and I suitcases full of Malaysian yummies. This time, there were 4 stuffed suitcases that were filled with food-stuff. One of them was sweet red “taucu” sauce, which is known as Hoisin sauce in Malaysia. This Hoisin (seafood) sauce is not the black type that is popular in US/Canada. See here for the American version. I cannot find the red taucu/hoisin sauce in this part of the world for the life of me!

“Taucu” is a fermented soy bean sauce. I suppose this one that I’ve used is red because of the type of bean used? I find it less salty compared to the brown “taucu” sauce that is usually used to cook fishes and pork. Leave it to the Chinese to come up with a gazillion of soy bean sauces, eh?

This is the ultimate healthy snack for me. It brings back fond memories of my primary school days when we rush out the school compound when the last bell rings to signify that school is out for the day. I believe that right outside each school in Malaysia has several junk food peddlers that tempt every school kid into buying snacks, which drove parents nuts because it would spoil the kid’s appetite for proper meals that are being served at home. Sometimes, there are houses opposite the school that take advantage of school kids too. A few of them had set up tables in front of their houses to sell snacks to children to make a few bucks for the day. I didn’t mind it as a kid, the more choices, the better!

Most of the snacks sold outside the school are wrapped in plastic, but there are some that are not, such as this “sengkuang” snack. It’s not exactly hygenic because the streets are dusty and buses and cars are usually lined up outside of school, waiting for the kids to be released from school. This is probably why the schools stations prefects (school student police, we call ’em bulldogs) outside the school to take down names of students buying “makanan diluar” (outside food). Maybe a few kids of gotten food poisoning from the snacks, but not me😛 Having prefects guarding the school compounds made it even more exciting for us to “curi-curi” (sneak) buy snacks, LOL!

Oh by the way, sengkuang is called jicama or yambean on this side of the world. My parents told me that it was turnip, they LIED to me for 28 years!

Ingredients

  • Jicama, peeled and sliced to about 0.5cm thick
  • Taucu manis (sweet red hoisin sauce)
  • Sugar
  • Ground peanut

Method

  1. Spread taucu manis on one side of the sliced jicama.
  2. Sprinkle sugar and ground peanut on top of the taucu merah. Use more ground peanut for added crunch.
  3. What else, enjoy lah!

5 responses to “Sengkuang with Hoisin Sauce Snack

  1. Joanna Abishegam-David

    Gosh, I used to eat this at the school canteen in Convent Bukit Nanas in Kuala Lumpur many moons ago. I used to think it tasted divine and if the dinner lady was realy kind she’d sprinkle extra sugat and peanuts on it for you! Yummy. i think I haven’t eaten it since I left school, aeons ago! Thanks for the reminder.

  2. Hi…I;ve been looking HIGH and LOW for this taucu sauce to make mee rebus. Does this mean that I can use Hoisin sauce to make mee rebus instead of finding something called tauchu?? Thanks!

  3. I don’t recommend using the North American hoisin sauce for mee rebus. It has a weird sweet taste to is… Sorry for the late response!

  4. Hi i remember this snack that is why i googled its description and it brought me to your site. I use to have it in the school canteen of St Theresa Convent Brickfields. Strang after i moved to another schools in PJ i have never come across this snack beinh served in canteens. It was yummy snack apart from the curry puffs and cucur udang…hmmm

  5. Hi just want to know where can i find red taucu hoisin sauce? There are so many sauces in asian grocer in aust do you know any particulat brand?Pls recommend . Thks

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